Collaboration Model

One of the absolutely most important success factors for successful outsourcing is a functioning collaboration model. This model also incorporates proactive measures and the associated work.

The forms of collaboration in the model must reflect the objectives outlined in concluded agreements as well as the requirements and expectations that have not been contractually specified. Our approach to collaboration is described below. One of the most important lessons from earlier assignments is that a successful collaboration should be based on agreed goals, strategies and openness in the relationship.

  • Clear requirements and expectations
  • Openness in the relationship and communication
  • Business integrity
  • Ability and desire to resolve conflicts
  • Flexibility and adaptability in the delivery over time

A critical success factor for successful collaboration over the entire term of contract is that the collaboration between people works. We ensure at an early phase that key roles and people in our delivery to you are a part of the business process in order to ensure knowledge about requirements and expectations. In recent years, development of our internal work approach has contributed to the development of our forms of collaboration. Traditional agreements with a focus on operation and management as separate areas has developed over time into cohesive functions coupled with, among other things, managed service levels on functions.

Our collaboration model is based on three levels: Operative level (delivery level), tactical level (agreement level) and strategic level (business level). Collaborative processes are always the foundation of day-to-day work relating to incidents, problems, changes, etc.

Strategic level

The purpose of strategic meetings is to develop the delivery and relationship between the parties. Coordination to ensure that the supplier lives up to the overall objective and agreed delivery. We establish detailed meeting routines, input for the meeting, agenda and output from the meeting.

Meeting routines:

  • Meeting frequency of 2 times per year
  • Every meeting is recorded by Britt
  • The next meeting is scheduled at the conclusion of the current meeting

Input for the meeting:

  • Preceding minutes
  • Information from the contract meeting
  • Innovations and possibilities from Britt

Agenda:

  • Preceding minutes
  • Review of the delivery’s compliance with contractual specifications
  • New conditions from operations
  • Products and innovations from Britt’s product development
  • Monitoring of the surrounding world
  • Customer satisfaction studies
  • Conclusive questions and the central matters from the contract level
  • Next meeting

Output from the meeting:

  • Minutes

Agreements/Tactical level

The purpose of the contract meetings is to see that we, as the supplier, live up to the overall objective and agreed delivery.

We analyse trends and significant discrepancies and make the necessary changes in the delivery. We establish detailed meeting routines, input for the meeting, agenda and output from the meeting.

Meeting routines:

  • Meeting frequency of 6 times per year (1 time per month if necessary)
  • Every meeting is recorded by Britt
  • The next meeting is scheduled at the conclusion of the current meeting

Input for the meeting:

  • Preceding minutes
  • Information from operative meetings

Agenda:

  • Preceding minutes
  • Reports: Economy, SLA review, documentation from delivery meetings
  • Management of the agreement: Provision of personnel and competence, new operational requirements and changes, securing of third-party supply
  • Improvements: Identify possibility of improvements in services, changes in service catalogue
  • Escalations: Escalate and prepare questions to be addressed in strategic meeting
  • Next meeting

Output from the meeting:

  • Minutes

Operative level

The purpose of the operative meetings is to see that we, as the supplier, live up to the agreed delivery and are responsible for the day-to-day review. We cover reporting of SLA, statistics and trends. We establish detailed meeting routines, input for the meeting, agenda and output from the meeting.

Meeting routines:

  • Meeting frequency of 1 time per month
  • Every meeting is recorded by Britt
  • The next meeting is scheduled at the conclusion of the current meeting

Input for the meeting:

  • Preceding minutes
  • Reports from operations

Agenda:

  • Preceding minutes
  • Reports: Outcome for service levels and SLA, Service Desk review, number of matters, response time, degree of resolution, review of incident management, review of problem management, review of change management, installation volumes, quantity and change
  • Service provision: Service Desk, data centres and servers, communication, applications, workplace, circulation of operations
  • List of activities, planned activities for the operative delivery
  • Pending projects
  • Feedback from the customer and experience with Britt
  • Other questions
  • Next meeting

Output from the meeting:

  • Minutes

CAB council

The purpose of the CAB is to provide a decision-making form to implement proposed changes (Change Advisory Board – CAB). It is a discussion forum for clients involving meeting routines, input for the meeting, agenda and output from the meeting.

Meeting routines:

  • Meeting frequency of 1 time per week according to a defined schedule
  • Every meeting is recorded by Britt
  • Every CAB matter is registered by Britt

Input for the meeting:

  • Registered CAB matters

Agenda:

  • Information about current service window and patch window
  • Review of CAB matters for decisions
  • Decision
  • Other questions

Output from the meeting:

  • Minutes
  • CAB calendar

Processes and order with ITIL within service management

We utilise the five following components for service management.

  • Service Strategy
  • Service Design
  • Service Transition
  • Service Operation
  • Continual Service Improvement

To develop Britt’s organisation and our packaged services and products so that we work with various elements within the service strategy and service design:

  • Service Strategy Group
  • Service Catalogue
  • Capacity Management
  • Availability Management (SLA)
  • Security Management
  • Continuity Management

Service Level Agreement

In order to ensure that requirements on reliable and secure IT operation and communication are fulfilled, we include a Service Level Agreement (SLA) with our contracts.

Security Management

We work with ITIL Security Management, which as a process for working with security matters within an organisation in a structured manner. ITIL Security Management is based on the standard ISO 27001 and we work with Security Management (based on ISO 27001) for the following reasons:

  • It establishes a security-based approach to protect critical and sensitive information.
  • It provides an overview with a critical approach in order to safeguard information and compliance.
  • To demonstrate credibility, trust, satisfaction and credibility with customers, employees and suppliers.
  • To demonstrate a security status in accordance with internationally accepted criteria.
  • To give global acceptance with international companies.

Advantages:

  • An extension of the current quality system in order to include security
  • A possibility of identifying and handling risks to important information and access to various systems
  • To give confidence and security to customers, employees and suppliers
  • To enable independent auditing and assurance to the customer relating to information security

Service Transition

In service transition, we work with development and improvement in order to provide new and updated services. We utilise innovations while remaining aware of risks and thereby avoid undesired consequences. At Britt, we utilise the following processes in the scope of service transition.

  • Change management
  • The Change Advisory Board (CAB) ensures that all voices are heard
  • Release Management
  • Configuration Management

Service Operation

Service operation utilises the following processes: Incident Management and Problem Management. Then the Service Desk function also uses a few processes from service transition. Some of the key service management processes (ITIL) that the Service Desk works with are:

  • Incident Management
  • Problem Management
  • Change Management
  • Release Management
  • Configuration Management